Perry County voters chose to make some changes in county government, but not at the top.

Perry County Judge-Executive Scott Alexander, a Democrat, and former judge-executive Denny Ray Noble, a Republican, waged a contentious battle to see who would serve the county for the next four years. 

According to unofficial election results from the Kentucky Secretary of State’s Office, Alexander was ultimately victorious Tuesday, beating Noble by a total of 1,661 votes, taking 5,793 votes, or about 58 percent of votes cast as opposed to Noble’s 4,132 votes, or nearly 42 percent of votes cast. 

A week before the election, the race got ugly when documents were released showing debt amounts for the county and the commonwealth attorney’s office released a report that a Perry County grand jury was ordering further investigation into claims made in an audit by Kentucky Auditor of Public Accounts Mike Harmon’s office.

Alexander said Wednesday he is happy to come out on top and serve a second term. 

“I just really want to thank the people,” Alexander said. “My family and I love this community. The team we have will continue to work very hard to make positive changes for Perry County,” he continued. 

Other county positions were also filled in the election, including magistrates, constables and more. 

John Carl Shackelford (Dem) returned for the position of  County Attorney, receiving 7,255 votes, or 100 percent of votes cast, running unopposed. 

Wayne Napier, a Republican, defeated the incumbent County Clerk Tonya Delph McQueen (D) for the position of county clerk, with Napier receiving 5,738 votes, or about 59 percent of votes cast while McQueen received 4,033 votes, or about 41 percent of votes cast.

The position of property valuation administrator was won by John Frank Gross, who received 5,519 votes, or about 57 percent of votes cast. His opponent, David “Digger” Sandlin, received 4,119 votes, or about 43 percent of votes cast. 

The winner for magistrate in the 1st Magisterial District was Don Miller, who received 2,114 votes, or about 62 percent of votes cast as compared to his opponent’s, Steve Argonis’ 1,321 votes, or about 38 percent of votes cast. The constable winner for the 1st Magisterial District was Ben Stidham who defeated his opponent Harold “Hal” Dixon. Stidham received 1,877 votes, or about 55 percent of votes cast and Dixon received 1,505 votes, or about 45 percent of votes cast. 

The winner of the magistrate’s race in the 2nd Magisterial District was Ronald D. Combs, who defeated his opponent, Douglas R. Bryant. Combs received 1,786 votes, or nearly 58 percent of votes cast, while Bryant received 1,317 votes, or about 42 percent of votes cast. 

The constable winner in District 2 was David B. Miller, who received 1,738 votes, or nearly 62 percent of votes cast, as opposed to his opponent Lyndon F. Combs, who received 1,076 votes, or about 38 percent of votes cast.   

The winner of the magistrate’s seat in the 3rd Magisterial Dist. was Clayton Church, who defeated his opponents Wes Callahan  and write-in candidate Randy Sumner. Church received 1,688 votes, or about 56 percent of votes cast, while Callahan received 1,317 votes, or about 43 percent of votes cast and Sumner received 28 votes, or about one percent of votes cast. 

Eugene “Buck” Fields won the position of constable for the 3rd District, defeating his opponent Howard Young Jr. Fields received 1,812 votes, or about 61 percent of votes cast and Young received 1,165 votes, or about 39 percent of votes cast.

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